http://www.deimori.it/index.php?cialis-generico-no-brasilhttp://www.decoderonline.it/index.php?dipendenza-psicologica-da-levitraopinioni cialis 10http://www.deimori.it/index.php?cialis-20-mg-a-cosa-serve"shop"
Melancholia News

There ain’t no melancholy for Melancholia star Kirsten Dunst and Moneyball, Tree of Life actor Brad Pitt!

The National Society of Film Critics honored the two stars Saturday at its 46th annual awards as Best Actress and Best Actor, as well as naming Dunst’s Melancholia, directed by iconoclast Lars von Trier, as Best Picture.

Dunst’s role in the end-of-the-world drama continues to look like an Oscar contender—the actress took Best Actress for the role at Cannes before getting the Critics nod Saturday, beating out Yun Jung-hee for her role in Poetry and Meryl Streep in The Iron Lady.

As for the allegorical film itself, Melancholia topped Pitt’s and Sean Penn‘s Tree of Life to be honored as Best Picture by the group.

But Tree of Life was strong, winning Terrence Malick the Best Director honor, and also figuring into Jessica Chastain‘s nod for Best Supporting Actress (in addition to her roles in The Help and Take Shelter).

So there were plenty of awards to go around, as long as you were Tree of Life or Melancholia, that is.

Complete List of Winners:

• Best Picture: Melancholia
• Best Director: Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life
• Best Actor:  Brad Pitt, Moneyball, The Tree of Life
• Best Actress:
Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia
• Best Supporting Actor: Albert Brooks, Drive
• Best Supporting Actress: Jessica Chastain, The Tree of Life, Take Shelter, The Help
• Best Screenplay:
A Separation, Asghar Farhadi
• Best Cinematography: The Tree of Life, Emmanuel Lubezki
• Best Nonfiction Film: Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Werner Herzog
• Best Foreign Language Film: A Separation, Asghar Farhadi
• Best Experimental Film: Seeking the Monkey King, Ken Jacobs

Source

Gallery Public Appearances

I’m back and will try to get up-to-date around here again.First the pictures from THR’s Annual “Power 100: Women In Entertainment Breakfast”.


Site Updates

I’m so sorry!!

I’ve been a bad webmistress these past months, my personal life is busy busy busy and finding just a little time and energy to update KDO is very hard for me which is resulting in me feeling very guilty. In order for me to get rid of some of all this guilt then I’ve decided to put this site on a hiatus for an unknown period of time, hopefully not for too long.

Sorry for the trouble and thanks for understanding!


News Rumors

The French are just so passionate, aren’t they?

Sometimes a little too much, especially in Kirsten Dunst‘s case. A judge has granted the Melancholia actress a temporary restraining order against a man from Dijon, France, who has written over 50 letters and even traveled to the U.S. to try to meet her.

But that’s not all…

Jean Christophe Prudhon wrote in letters accompanying Dunst’s petition that he sold his home in France so that he could continue to travel where the actress goes so that he might meet her.

And there’s more.

Prudhon also contacted Dunst’s mother, who wrote in a sworn declaration that she was alarmed when he came to her door last week trying to meet her daughter.

For now, the French fan is to remain 100 yards away from Dunst, and on Dec. 21, the judge will decide whether to grant a three-year restraining order.

Source


Magazines Photoshoots

Kirsten is covering another 2 magazines; Lucky & C Magazine. Check out the pictures below!



Gallery Magazines

I have so many magazine scans from the past few months so I’ve decided that instead of adding them all in one go then I’ve divided them into smaller updates. Starting with the magazines that Kirsten have so gracefully covered: Wonderland, Flare, Stella, Manhattan/Riviera/Angeleno.





Interviews Melancholia

This year at Cannes, the person who squirmed sitting next to Lars von Trier at his notorious “Melancholia” Cannes press conference, during which the Danish writer-director offended just about everybody by calling himself a Nazi, was his star, Kirsten Dunst.  In the days to follow he apologized repeatedly for the “stupid, idiotic” comments that led to his banishment from the festival.

But he also had to repair the damage he had done to his relationship with Dunst.  “It was probably harder on her than anyone else,” Von Trier told me the night he was going to meet her for a makeup dinner.

Putting balm on the wound was the closing night ceremony, when Dunst gratefully accepted the best actress Palme, thanking the festival for allowing “Melancholia” to stay in competition. Afterwards she said that she should not have been punished for von Trier’s “inappropriate” comments. Nor should she. “Melancholia” starts off with Dunst’s lavish castle wedding, destroyed by the beautiful bride’s plunge into depression, followed by how she and her family deal with a planet hurtling toward a possible collision with Earth. “Melancholia” might have had a shot at the Palme d’Or won by “The Tree of Life” had it not been overshadowed by von Trier’s misbehavior. (More details on the film and a sampling of reviews are here.)

By the time of our video interview below, Dunst, who had already weathered a Cannes controversy with Sofia Coppola’s “Marie Antoinette,” had clearly forgiven her director. She was sorry to have missed a celebratory party, and clearly has learned to measure her words carefully with the media. After all, she’s been working in high-profile films since 1994’s “Interview with the Vampire” at age 12. And she’s happy to carry the promo load on “Melancholia”–as Von Trier has refused to give any more interviews. “Maybe that’s not a bad thing,” she says, laughing.

Working with Von Trier, contrary to previous reports, was “not difficult,” she says. Both had experienced depression; he opened up to her and earned her trust, she sys: “I couldn’t feel so vulnerable if I didn’t feel taken care of by Lars.”

Dunst admits that she got off easy on this one, compared to what Charlotte Gainsbourg had to do on “Anti-Christ.” She worried about her parents seeing her magnificient nude display, but her father told her it was “artistic.” “Only Lars and Pedro Almodovar write these incredible, messy roles for women,” she says. Even the department heads on the film were women: “He needs nurturing.” She would happily work with Von trier again–along with Almodovar and Michael Haneke.

While she has been heading in an indie direction since leaving the “Spider-Man” franchise, “I’m not an indie intense person at all,” she insists. In fact, she’s now shooting a dark indie comedy with Isla Fisher, “Bachelorette,” based on rookie director Leslye Hedland’s play. “We’ve lightened it,” she says. In January Dunst starts another indie adapted from the stage, Adam Rapp’s bleak drama “Red Light Winter, ” which the NYT called “a frank, graphic story of erotic fixation and the havoc it can wreak on sensitive souls.” The movie will co-star Mark Ruffalo and Billy Crudup.


Source


Interviews

Melancholia hasn’t just brought actress Kirsten Dunst critical acclaim, but also the coveted Best Actress Award at Cannes. In the conclusion of our interview, Kirsten discusses the experience of working with controversial director Lars Von Triers, how she unwinds from such a challenging role and her relationship with REM.

 

EXAMINER: When you work with a director that doesn’t do a lot of rehearsals, how does that affect your process?

KIRSTEN: Every film set is a totally different energy. You don’t know what everyone’s going to be like and you kind of have to work within what you’re given. Also, I do a lot of preparation before I start a movie. So, it gave me a lot of freedom actually. I appreciated it. Being on Lars’ set is the best film school in the world.

 

EXAMINER: Do you do a lot of research before you do a role?

KIRSTEN: Not research, but as I said it before, it’s almost like therapy between me and who I’m playing.

 

EXAMINER: With a role that’s so dark, is there a lightness when the cameras aren’t rolling?

KIRSTEN:  I was playing Angry Birds in my trailer (laughs). You’ve got to. You have to self-preserve. That’s part of it, too. You don’t have to sit there and be depressed to play depressed. Actually, you should be in a good place to play depressed, I think. We moved pretty swiftly, too, so there was definitely momentum. Lars has a great sense of humor, too. He’d yell out “Stop acting.” So, it was a very heavy thing and I’d have to prepare, but making a movie doesn’t have to be drudgery, just because of the subject matter. There was a lot of lightness, too.


Page 31 of 68« First...1020...2930313233...405060...Last »